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Regular video game use was found to reduce respondents' chances of going into higher education from 24% to 19%

Regular video game use was found to reduce respondents' chances of going into higher education from 24% to 19%

Regular video game use - when combined with no other extracurricular activities - was found to reduce respondents' chances of going into higher education from 24 percent to 19 percent for boys and from 20 percent to 14 percent for girls.

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A study of 17,200 men and women born in 1970 has found that playing computer games regularly "and doing no other activities" noticeably reduced the chances of an individual going to university.

The survey, conducted by Mark Taylor, from Oxford University's department of sociology, questioned participants about their extracurricular activities at the age of 16 (in 1986) and about their careers at the age of 33 (in 2003). It also took note of whether they went to university or not.

Regular video game use - when combined with no other extracurricular activities - was found to reduce respondents' chances of going into higher education from 24 percent to 19 percent for boys and from 20 percent to 14 percent for girls.
Fans of gaming will be pleased to hear, however, that a solid grounding in the world of video games didn't seem to affect the class of 1988's career prospects.

Taylor "found that playing computer games frequently did not make it less likely that 16-year-olds would be in a professional or managerial career at 33", the study's report reads.

What did affect career prospects significantly? Reading, of course. Read Oxford University's report on the study for more details.

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